Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium and Free School Meals application

At Trinity Catholic School, we avoid using the terms ‘pupil premium’ and ‘disadvantaged’ when referring to students who access or have accessed Free School Meals. These students are known as ‘Marist’. We made this change in 2014 to ensure that our communication better reflected our Catholic ethos – identifying these students who will thrive with greater love, compassion, support, and resilience. We conciously walk the ‘Way of Mary’ with them.

Trinity School ensures that leaders effectively use additional government funding, including the Pupil Premium, allocated to the school and measure its impact on outcomes for pupils. The Governors hold the school to account for the use of this funding. The Pupil Premium is additional funding for publicly funded schools in England to raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers, and enable them to achieve their aspirations. Pupil Premium funding is available to Trinity School because it is a local authority-maintained school. The Pupil Premium funding is allocated to schools to support the education of students from low-income families who are eligible for free school meals (FSM) or students who are continuously looked after or adopted.

Funding in the financial year 2016 to 2017

In the 2016 to 2017 financial year, Trinity School will receive the following funding for each child registered as eligible for free school meals at any point in the last 6 years: £935 for pupils in year 7 to year 11. Trinity will also receive £1,900 for each pupil who has left local-authority care because of 1 of the following:

  • Adoption;
  • A special guardianship order;
  • A child arrangements order;
  • A residence order.

If a pupil has been registered as eligible for free school meals and has also left local-authority care for any of the reasons above, they will attract the £1,900 rate. Children who have been in local-authority care for 1 day or more also attract £1,900 of Pupil Premium funding. Funding for these pupils goes to the virtual school head (VSH) in the local authority that looks after the child. VSHs are responsible for managing pupil premium funding for looked-after children.

In the summary reports we provide information on the current academic year:

  • The school’s pupil premium grant allocation for the current academic year 2016-2017;
  • A summary of the main barriers to educational achievement faced by eligible pupils at the school;
  • How the school will spend the allocation to address those barriers and the reasons for that approach;
  • How the school will measure the impact of the pupil premium;
  • The date of the next review of the school’s pupil premium strategy.

And for the previous academic year:

  • How the school spent the previous academic year’s allocation 2015-2016;
  • The impact of the expenditure on eligible and other pupils, i.e. how it made a difference to the attainment of disadvantaged pupils.

 

The academic year 2015 – 2016

(a) Details of how Trinity School spent the previous academic year’s allocation, i.e. 2015-2016.

(b) The impact of the expenditure on the eligible and other pupils, i.e. how it made a difference to the attainment of disadvantaged pupils.

Pupil Premium Marist Action Plan 2015-16

Pupil Premium (Marist) Impact Statement

The academic year 2016 – 2017

(a) The school’s pupil premium allocation for the current academic year 2016-2017.

(b) A summary of the main barriers to educational achievement faced by eligible pupils at the school.

(c) How the school will spend the allocation to address those barriers and the reasons for that approach.

(d) How the school will measure the impact of the pupil premium.

(e) The date of the next review of the school’s pupil premium strategy.